Nova Scotia Journal

Libya’s parliament postpones its next move amid election chaos

Prime Minister Abdulhamid al-interim Dbeibah

Key Takeaways:

  • On Monday, a parliamentary committee on elections issued a report stating that it would be impossible to hold an election on that date if problems were not addressed.

After a chaotic session reflecting the political crisis over the fate of the peace process, Libya’s parliament postponed a vote on how to handle the fallout from postponed national elections on Monday.

The election was to take place on Friday as part of a more significant effort to end Libya’s decade of chaos and violence by installing a new president and parliament with national legitimacy. Still, it was postponed due to rules disagreements.

Candidates, political factions, and politicians have since argued about how long the election should be postponed and whether Prime Minister Abdulhamid al-interim Dbeibah’s Government of National Unity (GNU) can continue in the interim.

The parliament session on Monday was the largest since Dbeibah’s government was installed in March, and it was the first since then to bring together legislators from all of the chamber’s warring factions.

Libya’s parliament; Image from indianexpress

Libya’s electoral commission announced last week that the election could not occur due to shortcomings in electoral legislation and the judicial appeals process and suggested that the election be postponed until January 24.

On Monday, a parliamentary committee on elections issued a report stating that it would be impossible to hold an election on that date if problems were not addressed.

The televised session was cut short due to shouted arguments, and it is expected to reconvene on Tuesday to vote on proposals such as postponing the election.

It is also likely to address the fate of the GNU and Dbeibah’s leadership, whose role as a presidential candidate was one of the major causes of the electoral disputes. According to the parliament’s electoral committee report, the government should be changed.

Some argue that Dbeibah should not have been allowed to run for president after promising not to do so when he took office and that it is unfair for him to run while still serving as prime minister.

Parliament was elected in 2014 in a vote that triggered Libya’s civil war between warring eastern and western factions, with most legislators siding with the east during the conflict.

Source: indianexpress

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