Nova Scotia Journal

Community concerned regarding the DND project at Hartlen Point

Nova Scotia

Key takeaways: 

  • A Department of National Defence warship testing facility is made on the Halifax-area peninsula.
  • The community members intend to use the photographs to allow them to protect the peninsula.

As Tony Rusinak and his neighbors stroll down a grassy path at Hartlen Point in Eastern Passage, they take pictures of every bird, insect, and tree they see.

The photographs are an aspect of an environmental campaign concentrated on finding, identifying, and logging as numerous species as probable in the space.

The community members intend to utilize the images to help them save the peninsula they use daily. 

Rusinak said the so-called bio blitz “is to bring truth to the natural value of the headland. So it’s one more way to add a complete database to the argument that this site should be rescued.”

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Tony Rusinak and his neighbors stroll down a grassy path at Hartlen Point in Eastern Passage

The Department of National Defence owns the rocky coastline, forest, and scrubland of Hartlen Point, and a $64-million testing building is set to be constructed there the following year. The facility will test the action, navigation, and communication systems of the new Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) ships. 

A Department of National Defence representative told CBC News that though the place is private property, the unit has “often permitted citizens to use the DND lands at Hartlen Point for bird watching, hiking, and other activities.”

Rusinak said the site is ecologically diverse and exceptional. He and almost 100 provincial people have created a Facebook group to share their worries regarding the project and have a community meeting on Monday.

“I’m concerned regarding the hundreds of thousands of migratory birds that come here every year,” Rusinak said. “The list runs on and on and on. There is a lot of wildlife on this point … also a lot of recreational activities and fishing activities.”

Source – cbc.ca

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