Nova Scotia Journal

Wednesday, August 17, 2022

Increasing prices force some communities to reconsider Canada Day parades

Nova Scotia

Key takeaways: 

  • Some prefer cultural programming practices to honor Indigenous communities.
  • The Enfield, Elmsdale & District Lions Club has managed the local Canada Day parade for nearly 40 years.

Peter Jeffery has been managing his regional Canada Day parade in East Hants, N.S., for 25 years, but he says increasing prices and waning community support have put the brakes on the event this year.

The parade typically goes from Elmsdale to Enfield, N.S., where the celebrations continue at the Lions Club, stated Jeffery, the district chapter president.

“The parade takes a lot of planning, and it has quite a bit of charge to it,” Jeffery said. “It’s developed over the years to what we had right up until just before COVID.”

Jeffery stated financial help has been falling for years, and fewer volunteers have stepped up to help manage and carry out the event.

“It ended up with only us trying to drag things together,” he said, adding that allocation from the federal government hasn’t increased as expenses for the celebrations — from fireworks to insurance — have risen drastically.

Read more: Nova Scotians 50+ can reserve a second COVID-19 booster beginning July 8

The parade typically goes from Elmsdale to Enfield, N.S., where the celebrations continue at the Lions Club, stated Jeffery, the district chapter president

He said that a new need for a federal budget to ensure the event will happen started Jeffery pulling the plug on the event last fall.

Other cities and towns in the same place

Jeffery isn’t alone. Some cities and towns say increasing costs and funding woes have them reconsidering their parades.

There will be no Canada Day parade for the third year in Montreal. Canada Day celebrations will take place with affairs at the Old Port.

In Strathcona County, Alta., the Sherwood Park and District Chamber of Commerce declared in May that the Canada Day parade would not take place due to the inflated prices of physical infrastructure, insurance, and security duties.

Source – cbc.ca

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