Nova Scotia Journal

Tuesday, January 31, 2023

About Us

Nova Scotians have a new destination for the latest local news, features on community leaders and events, business openings and everything in between, with the debut of NovaScotiaJournal.com. The NSJ is powered by The Canadian Press journalist’s award-winning news to provide the local news content on the website.

Desktop?  Mobile? Tablet? Definitely. 

We break locally-driven news written by local journalists and cover all the important issues in Nova Scotia.  It’s our top priority. We update throughout the day, so when you come back to visit, chances are you’ll find something new.

In addition to hard news, we also provide information that is important to the community that you won’t find in most media.  We like to write stories about new local businesses, highlight special events and bring you general information about anything that impacts the heart of the community.  Although we are hyper-local in our approach, we also provide national news from The Canadian Press, editorial columnists, entertainment and special features.

We’re independent and it shows in everything we do. And we promise that we’ll remain fiercely local. Like you.

Let us know what you think at Contact Us.

Nova Scotia is a province in eastern Canada. With a population of 923,598 as of 2016, it is the most populous of Canada’s four Atlantic provinces. It is the country’s second-most densely populated province and second-smallest province by area, both after neighbouring Prince Edward Island. 

“Nova Scotia” means “New Scotland” in Latin and is the recognized English-language name for the province. In both French and Scottish Gaelic, the province is directly translated as “New Scotland” (French: Nouvelle-Écosse. Gaelic: Alba Nuadh). In general, Romance and Slavic languages use a direct translation of “New Scotland”, while most other languages use direct transliterations of the Latin / English name.

The province was first named in the 1621 Royal Charter granting to Sir William Alexander in 1632 the right to settle lands including modern Nova Scotia, Cape Breton Island, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and the Gaspé Peninsula.